Day 24: Main Activity – Rebus Texts in the Morning Circle with the Child with Special Needs

Day 24- Main Activity – Rebus Texts in the morning circle with the child with special needsThis is a post out of the “31 Days of Morning Circles for the Child with Special Needs”.  You can find the main page for this series here.

Note: If you’re reading this series for the first time, I suggest you look at the daily structure post to understand the routine we follow in our morning circle.

Rebus stories or poems are texts where some words are represented by pictures. The texts are often sight words/ phrases. The image helps the child “read” without having to decipher words that are often beyond his developmental level.

My little guy is far from understanding that letters have sounds and that together they create words. For this reason, I approach reading from whole to part. He is aware of words as he shows solid receptive language comprehension, and he also notices that words have sound parts or syllables. This is why using rebus texts (poems or stories) in the morning circle is a great path to beginning reading practice.

Rebus activity in the morning circle:

Here is a quick activity you can adapt to any theme or topic.

Use the words “I like” and follow it by symbols, words, or phrases that help your child build vocabulary within a theme. I make a point of using images that appear in other parts of our curriculum, such as in song choice cards. This way, my son immediately makes connections between the images and words.

I like_rebus folder for child with special needs

I create different rebus folders for different starter phrases. This is the “I like” folder. I keep the words “I like” within the folder at all times, but I change up the images as needed (see below).

Caption:  Even though my son isn’t reading aloud, I’m certain that as we read this rebus text together he is saying it right along with me in his head. He allows me to use his pointer finger to point to each word and image.He is already familiar with the ASL sign for “like”, so I also sign the words after we say them. Eventually, I don’t sign, but just read.

Even though my son isn’t reading aloud, I’m certain that as we read this rebus text together he is saying it right along with me in his head. He allows me to use his pointer finger to point to each word and image.He is already familiar with the ASL sign for “like”, so I also sign the words after we say them. Eventually, I don’t sign, but just read. I reuse this folder by replacing the images, not the phrases.

Variations:

  • use beginner phrases such as: “I am _____” (followed by feelings), “I will _____” (followed by ADLs or activities you will do that week), “I saw _____” (followed by photos of things your child saw on an outing) – create a separate folder for each
  • use ending phrases such as: “ ____ is blue” (preceded by images of things that are blue), “_____ is soft” (preceded by images of objects that are soft), “_____ is happy” (preceded by images of faces/ animals/ objects with happy faces)
  • use middle phrases such as: “_____ is _____”, “______ needs _______”, “_______has ______”
  • favorite nursery rhymes

How can you include rebus texts in your morning circle?

Wordless Picture Books

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